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This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

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Vitamin D receptor ChIP-seq in primary CD4+ cells: relationship to serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and autoimmune disease

  • Adam E Handel1, 2,
  • Geir K Sandve3,
  • Giulio Disanto1,
  • Antonio J Berlanga-Taylor1,
  • Giuseppe Gallone1,
  • Heather Hanwell1,
  • Finn Drabløs4,
  • Gavin Giovannoni2,
  • George C Ebers1 and
  • Sreeram V Ramagopalan1, 2Email author
BMC Medicine201311:163

DOI: 10.1186/1741-7015-11-163

Received: 8 January 2013

Accepted: 20 June 2013

Published: 12 July 2013

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
8 Jan 2013 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
23 Jan 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Bruce Hollis
14 Feb 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Michael Holick
4 Mar 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Valentina Boeva
9 May 2013 Author responded Author comments - Adam Handel
Resubmission - Version 3
9 May 2013 Submitted Manuscript version 3
1 Jun 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Valentina Boeva
10 Jun 2013 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Michael Holick
Resubmission - Version 4
Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
20 Jun 2013 Editorially accepted
12 Jul 2013 Article published 10.1186/1741-7015-11-163

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Medical Research Council Functional Genomics Unit and Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford
(2)
Blizard Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry
(3)
Department of Informatics, University of Oslo
(4)
Bioinformatics & Gene Regulation, Norwegian University of Science and Technology

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