Skip to main content

Advertisement

Open Access
Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Chronic fatigue syndrome in an ethnically diverse population: the influence of psychosocial adversity and physical inactivity

  • Kamaldeep S Bhui1Email author,
  • Sokratis Dinos1,
  • Deborah Ashby2,
  • James Nazroo3,
  • Simon Wessely4 and
  • Peter D White1
Contributed equally
BMC Medicine20119:26

DOI: 10.1186/1741-7015-9-26

Received: 1 November 2010

Accepted: 21 March 2011

Published: 21 March 2011

Back to article

Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
1 Nov 2010 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
1 Dec 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Stefan Kempke
3 Dec 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Roumiana Boneva
12 Dec 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Jos W.M. van der Meer
13 Dec 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Athula Sumathipala
17 Jan 2011 Author responded Author comments - Kamaldeep Bhui
Resubmission - Version 3
17 Jan 2011 Submitted Manuscript version 3
19 Jan 2011 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Stefan Kempke
1 Feb 2011 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Roumiana Boneva
3 Feb 2011 Author responded Author comments - Kamaldeep Bhui
Resubmission - Version 4
3 Feb 2011 Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
21 Mar 2011 Editorially accepted
21 Mar 2011 Article published 10.1186/1741-7015-9-26

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article.. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Centre for Psychiatry, Wolson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London
(2)
Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London
(3)
School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester
(4)
Department of Psychological Medicine and Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London

Advertisement