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Nut consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease, total cancer, all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies

  • Dagfinn Aune1, 2Email author,
  • NaNa Keum3,
  • Edward Giovannucci3, 4, 5,
  • Lars T. Fadnes6,
  • Paolo Boffetta7,
  • Darren C. Greenwood8,
  • Serena Tonstad9,
  • Lars J. Vatten1,
  • Elio Riboli2 and
  • Teresa Norat2
BMC Medicine201614:207

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-016-0730-3

Received: 28 January 2016

Accepted: 26 October 2016

Published: 5 December 2016

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
28 Jan 2016 Submitted Original manuscript
Author responded Author comments
Reviewed Reviewer Report
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
Author responded Author comments
Reviewed Reviewer Report
Resubmission - Version 3
Submitted Manuscript version 3
Author responded Author comments
Reviewed Reviewer Report
Resubmission - Version 4
Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
26 Oct 2016 Editorially accepted
5 Dec 2016 Article published 10.1186/s12916-016-0730-3

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology
(2)
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London
(3)
Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
(4)
Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
(5)
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School
(6)
Centre for International Health, Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care & Department of Clinical Dentistry, University of Bergen
(7)
The Tisch Cancer Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
(8)
Biostatistics Unit, Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Leeds
(9)
Department of Preventive Cardiology, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål

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