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Table 3 Effectsa (logit) of experiencing a transition in self-rated health, by sex (2004–2015)

From: Differences in the health transition patterns of migrants and non-migrants aged 50 and older in southern and western Europe (2004–2015)

Effects (logit) of transitioning as compared to remaining in good (or more) self-rated health
  Males (N = 39,807) Females (N = 43,839)
Log pseudo-likelihood −35,304 −38,987
Pseudo R2 0.0735 0.0820
  to fair health to poor health to fair health to poor health
b SE b SE b SE b SE
Origin: non-migrants (ref)
 Western migrants 0.19** 0.08 0.37** 0.16 0.21*** 0.07 0.29* 0.16
 Non-western migrants 0.20* 0.12 0.45* 0.25 0.19 0.12 0.21 0.26
Effects (logit) of transitioning as compared to remaining in fair self-rated health
  Males (N = 12,763) Females (N = 16,944)
Log pseudo-likelihood −15,648 −20,737
Pseudo R2 0.0606 0.0583
  to good health to poor health to good health to poor health
b SE b SE b SE b SE
Origin: non-migrants (ref)
 Western migrants 0.03 0.12 0.02 0.15 −0.20** 0.09 0.26** 0.12
 Non-western migrants 0.14 0.18 −0.24 0.25 0.19 0.16 0.41** 0.20
Effects (logit) of transitioning as compared to remaining in poor self-rated health
  Males (N = 4430) Females (N = 5850)
Log pseudo-likelihood − 5187 − 6892
Pseudo R2 0.0676 0.0746
  to good health to fair health to good health to fair health
b SE b SE b SE b SE
Origin: non-migrants (ref)
 Western migrants 0.23 0.25 −0.10 0.19 −0.31 0.24 − 0.35** 0.16
 Non-western migrants 0.91** 0.40 0.16 0.35 −0.07 0.40 −0.09 0.27
  1. Source: Own calculations based on data from respondents aged 50 and older in 10 southern and western European countries in SHARE (2004–2015)
  2. aThe effects shown pertain to the fully adjusted model. Results for the intermediate steps are shown in the appendix
  3. * p < 0.1, ** p < 0.05, *** p < 0.01