Skip to main content

Table 3 Trends in the redistribution of recruits over time, 2013–2018

From: Is health research undertaken where the burden of disease is greatest? Observational study of geographical inequalities in recruitment to research in England 2013–2018

YearCCG (primary care and Trust data)CCG (primary care data only)LCRN (primary care and Trust data)LCRN (primary care data only)
All conditions
 2013–201446%39%9%18%
 2014–201544%44%15%19%
 2015–201644%45%13%19%
 2016–201745%42%14%18%
 2017–201843%42%11%24%
 Trend†−0.600.410.251.00
Mental health
 2013–201456%75%22%54%
 2014–201559%72%21%46%
 2015–201657%72%13%50%
 2016–201759%69%16%40%
 2017–201856%53%13%31%
 Trend†0.04−4.86−2.22−5.08
Diabetes
 2013–201456%58%36%28%
 2014–201555%67%25%47%
 2015–201659%72%26%52%
 2016–201757%74%26%52%
 2017–201860%74%27%62%
 Trend†1.084.04−1.657.13
  1. † Trend parameter represents the linear trend in the redistribution index. All trends are statistically significant (full data are presented in Additional file 1, Appendix 4). Patients can be redistributed from over-recruiting areas to under-recruiting areas and vice versa according to the direction and magnitude of effects. A positive trend indicates that the percentage of recruits needing re-distribution is increasing (i.e. that alignment between recruitment and prevalence is worse)