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Table 2 Estimated 2018 intervention coverage.

From: Ending malnutrition in all its forms requires scaling up proven nutrition interventions and much more: a 129-country analysis

Coverage
Intervention Global average [Between countries: median; inter-quartile range (IQR) and range between countries]
Low income country (LC), lower-middle income country (LMC) and upper-middle income country (UMC) averages
Sources and notes
Cash transfers (unconditional) 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Delayed umbilical cord clamping 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Infant and young child feeding education 30.3% [Between countries: median=26%; IQR=0-49.4%; range=0-89.6%]
LC average=22.6%, LMC average=38%, UMC average=28.4%
LiSTa [34]. The target population for IYCF education was taken to be all children 0-23 months. Note: Assumed to be coverage of “Complementary feeding – education only”.
Immediate initiation of breastfeeding 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Lipid-based nutrient supplements 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Oral rehydration solution + Zinc 6.6% [Between countries: median=0.2%; IQR=0-8.1%; range=0-50.7%]
LC average=12.3%, LMC average=8.6%, UMC average=1%
LiSTa [34].
Public provision of complementary foods 30% [Between countries: median=25.3%; IQR=0-49.4%; range=0-89.6%]
LC average=22%, LMC average=37.5%, UMC average=28.4%
LiSTa [34]. Note: Assumed to be coverage of “Complementary feeding – education and supplementation”.
Treatment of SAM 4.7% [Between countries: median=0%; IQR=0-1.9%; range=0-98%]
LC average=12.2%, LMC average=4.4%, UMC average=0%
LiST [34]. Assuming treatment only for children with weight-for-height more than three standard deviations below the WHO Child Growth Standards median (i.e. no management of moderate acute malnutrition).
Note: LiST states “Coverage data for this indicator are not typically available. Currently set at 0 for baseline; user should enter local data if possible and available.” Where available in the tool, values for some countries have been used.
Vitamin A supplementation 43.9% [Between countries: median=48.8%; IQR=9-67.5%; range=0-99%]
LC average=71.2%, LMC average=51.7%, UMC average=18.7%
DHS [37]/LiST [34]. Note: Default data used by LiST is from UNICEF [70].
Balanced energy-protein supplementation 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Calcium supplementation 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Iron and folic acid supplementation for pregnant women 17.2% [Between countries: median=4.5%; IQR=0-32.9%; range=0-81.5%]
LC average=20.6%, LMC average=22%, UMC average=10.7%
LiSTa [34]. Note: Assumed to be coverage of iron supplementation.
Iron and folic acid supplementation for women of reproductive age 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Intermittent preventative treatment of malaria during pregnancy 22.8% [Between countries: median=17.7%; IQR=0-36.9%; range=0-78.8%]
LC average=30.8%, LMC average=19.1%, UMC average=5.1%
LiSTa [34]; only includes countries with malaria risk.
Multiple micronutrient supplementation 0%   Not available; set to 0% at baseline.
Iron and folic acid fortification (wheat, maize or rice) 50%   Global estimate from Shekar et al. investment framework for nutrition (2017) [24]
Note: Authors state “Baseline coverage of fortification among staple foods (wheat, maize and rice) is based on the existence of legislation status for foods fortified in respective countries. We assume 0 percent if fortification legislation is in the planning stages, 25 percent for voluntary status, and 50 percent if mandatory fortification is legislated.”, citing [71, 72]
Iron and iodine fortification of salt 86%   Global estimate from UNICEF State of the World's Children (2017) [73]
Long-lasting insecticide-treated bed nets 47% [Between countries: median=54.9%; IQR=16.2-73.9%; range=0-96.7%]
LC average=62%, LMC average=39.6%, UMC average=15%
DHS [37]/LiSTa [34]; only includes countries with malaria risk.
  1. aLiST states “Coverage data for this indicator are drawn from DHS, MICS, and other nationally representative household surveys.”